Man with a funny name John.In my novel, the lists held by the tag "Swedes in America", because culinary fiction I generally dislike, and even with a prescription in the literature and can close the book forever.Yet by the end of the first chapter, I was totally fascinated by this book and forgive her and endless descriptions of fine dining, and all of these are far from my foodie-troubles, which the author does not get tired to ridicule ( "gluten-free oats sourced from the organic, pesticide- and GMO-free farm of Seymour and Peonie Shmidt, Faribault, MN, home-processed into oat flour ").The novel consists of a chain of stories that focus on every time a new person, but all the characters between them are somehow connected, and in every story, sooner or later there is Eva, a brilliant chef and a girl of mystery.

Yet by the end of the first chapter, I was totally fascinated by this book and forgive her and endless descriptions of fine dining, and all of these are far from my foodie-troubles, which the author does not get tired to ridicule ( "gluten-free oats sourced from the organic, pesticide- and GMO-free farm of Seymour and Peonie Shmidt, Faribault, MN, home-processed into oat flour ").The novel consists of a chain of stories that focus on every time a new person, but all the characters between them are somehow connected, and in every story, sooner or later there is Eva, a brilliant chef and a girl of mystery.But in general, every one were wonderful, and the book I definitely remember for a long time.

Personally, I really liked the story В«Sweet Pepper JellyВ», with its hint of the mystical and the bustling atmosphere of the student campus.Required reading for all those who love Fannie Flagg and Joanne Harris and general artistic about food and chefs.

Kitchens of the Great Midwest 4 out of 5 stars